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Your Rhymes / Re: Orange/oranges
« Last post by Angela on October 31, 2016, 12:05:29 am »
In the context of programming, "core engine" can rhyme with "orange in".
Note that this one, like 'door hinge', requires the Cot-Caught merger.
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Your Rhymes / Re: Orange/oranges
« Last post by glenra on October 30, 2016, 05:30:11 pm »
In the context of programming, "core engine" can rhyme with "orange in". Eg:

I labeled each part of the technical chart; the core engine's orange in color.
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Hi,

One of the goals of this dictionary is to make people more aware of their own accents and how accent-specific their rhymes might be. But it can be difficult to believe that accents exist where a given pair of words rhymes or doesn't rhyme. It can help to hear people with different accents pronounce the words. Here are some ways you can do that:

Text-to-speech
Your computer or phone probably has text-to-speech software built in, and it may have a selection of voices with regional accents.

On a Mac, you can go to System Preferences→Accessibility→Speech and choose a voice; you can download many voices with other accents and languages by choosing 'CustomizeÖ' at the bottom of that menu. Once you've chosen a voice, you can select text in any application and go to the Edit menu, Speech submenu, and choose 'Start Speaking'.

On an iPhone, you can change Siri's accent by going to Settings→Siri→Siri Voice and selecting an accent. Then you may need to turn on Speak Selection. Go to Settings→General→Accessibility→Speech and turn on Speak Selection. Now you can select text in any application and choose the 'SpeakÖ' option.

On the web, acapela group has a text-to-speech demo with several accents and languages.

Speech sample databases
There are several websites with recordings of different speakers reading a sample passage. Some I like are:

The Speech Accent Archive by George Mason University. This has the same passage read by native and non-native English speakers from around the world, and phonetic transcriptions of their recordings.

The Language Index by Marburg University. This one has speech samples and information on not only different accents of English but also many other languages of the world, and even some languages of other (fictional) worlds. You will have to create a free account to see all the languages.

Do you know of any other such resources, or how to change accents of the text-to-speech on other computers?
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Suggestions / Re: New accent parameters
« Last post by mtgordon on October 29, 2016, 11:08:06 pm »
Come to think, I suppose there are two distinct forms of panda/pander merger: merely non-rhotic (both sound to me like panda), and intrusive R, whether rhotic or not (both sound to me like pander). It's just that intrusive R is, in my experience, typically associated with non-rhotic accents.
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That does(nít) rhyme for me! / Re: bought/Clairaut
« Last post by Angela on October 29, 2016, 08:49:57 pm »
Indeed, I've heard there are several towns called Beaulieu with quite different pronunciations.
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Suggestions / Re: New accent parameters
« Last post by Angela on October 29, 2016, 08:27:40 pm »
Panda/pander merger. In my experience, it correlates strongly with non-rhoticity (So that's where the r went! They tacked it on at the end of the word!), but it's apparently not a perfect correlation, otherwise I'd propose merging it into the existing rhoticity setting.
The current non-rhotic setting does include pander as a rhyme for panda. To have this as a separate thing there could be either a separate panda/pander parameter, or one or two extra Rhoticity settings ('non-rhotic except for panda/pander', and 'rhotic except for panda/pander'.)

Once in a sandwich shop in Cambridge, Massachusetts, I heard a customer order a "lodge tuner." I suppose he wanted to tune his lodge. At Logan Airport in Boston one frequently hears overhead pages involving "Delter Aihlines."

Delter Aihlines is non-rhotic with an intrusive R, and I suppose the same is true of 'lodge tuner' (with bonus father-bother merger) as well, though I'm not sure if it's called an intrusive R if there's nothing after it. I used to be amused by the 'alleluia ralleluia' while people were singing hymns in New Zealand.

I could perhaps add a setting for intrusive Rs, but I'm still trying to figure out what to do with the R that appears in the pronunciation of panda (or some other word ending in a vowel) when it is followed by an R word (which gives 'panda' two pronunciations, with the same rhymes all up but the rhoticity setting switched.)
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That does(nít) rhyme for me! / Re: bought/Clairaut
« Last post by mtgordon on October 29, 2016, 07:45:04 pm »
There are so many ways to mispronounce French, though. You might be amused to travel through parts of the upper Mississippi watershed, the land of my birth, where many places were named by French missionaries, written down in books and on maps, and then thoroughly ignored by Europeans until Anglophone settlers arrived a century later and made valiant but typically incorrect guesses as to how those French names ought to be pronounced.
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That does(nít) rhyme for me! / Re: bought/Clairaut
« Last post by Angela on October 29, 2016, 07:38:10 pm »
Indeed, this is one that the macOS speech synthesis pronounces incorrectly (at least, incorrectly according to French pronunciation) with an American English voice, which is where I get pronunciations from. Does anyone out there pronounce it to rhyme with 'bought'? I'll need to know whether to change the existing pronunciation or add the version that rhymes with 'though' as a homograph. Or maybe there should be an 'Pronouncing French words like a French person' accent parameter.  :D
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Suggestions / Re: New accent parameters
« Last post by mtgordon on October 29, 2016, 07:34:41 pm »
Panda/pander merger. In my experience, it correlates strongly with non-rhoticity (So that's where the r went! They tacked it on at the end of the word!), but it's apparently not a perfect correlation, otherwise I'd propose merging it into the existing rhoticity setting.

Once in a sandwich shop in Cambridge, Massachusetts, I heard a customer order a "lodge tuner." I suppose he wanted to tune his lodge. At Logan Airport in Boston one frequently hears overhead pages involving "Delter Aihlines."
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That does(nít) rhyme for me! / bought/Clairaut
« Last post by mtgordon on October 29, 2016, 07:23:41 pm »
These don't rhyme in my accent, but though/Clairaut works for me.
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